Cool astronomy photos

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Witness
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Post by Witness » Thu May 31, 2018 1:13 am

Image

California nebula & the Pleiades. More pics on the photographer' site: http://www.deepskycolors.com/index-17.html.

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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Post by Bruce » Sat Jun 02, 2018 3:11 am

Moon formation simulation.
Such potential!

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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Post by Witness » Mon Jun 04, 2018 11:21 pm

Image

With some bioluminescence. :)

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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Post by Witness » Tue Jun 05, 2018 11:49 pm

Image
https://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/imagegallery/iotd.html
Gullies of Matara Crater

Gullies on Martian sand dunes, like these in Matara Crater, have been very active, with many flows in the last ten years.

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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Post by Grammatron » Thu Jun 07, 2018 7:36 am

I would have guessed it was an extreme close-up of chocolate.

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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Post by Witness » Sat Jun 09, 2018 4:04 am

↑ Ya all here are just stomachs on legs. :x

APOD wrote:Explanation: These people are not in danger. What is coming down from the left is just the Moon, far in the distance. Luna appears so large here because she is being photographed through a telescopic lens. What is moving is mostly the Earth, whose spin causes the Moon to slowly disappear behind Mount Teide, a volcano in the Canary Islands off the northwest coast of Africa. The people pictured are 16 kilometers away and many are facing the camera because they are watching the Sun rise behind the photographer. It is not a coincidence that a full moon rises just when the Sun sets because the Sun is always on the opposite side of the sky from a full moon. The featured video was made last week during the full Milk Moon. The video is not time-lapse -- this was really how fast the Moon was setting.
https://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap180604.html

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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Post by Bruce » Sat Jun 09, 2018 5:29 am

....and then the Canary Islanders sacrificed the moon, but the volcano gods were still not appeased.......
Such potential!

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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Post by Anaxagoras » Sat Jun 09, 2018 1:41 pm

The extreme zooming is cool.

If you want to hear about what the Juno probe has learned about Jupiter so far:



The first 1:45 is just the guy introducing the guy who's going to talk. You can skip that part if you want. The first 15 minutes or so is mostly talking about the mission and some basic overview of information about Jupiter. It is interesting and you might want to see that part for background. If you want to skip to the new stuff they've learned about Jupiter from Juno, that starts around 15 minutes in.
A fool thinks himself to be wise, but a wise man knows himself to be a fool.
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Post by Witness » Mon Jun 11, 2018 3:05 am

Image
This image, captured by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, shows a massive group of galaxies bound together by gravity: a cluster named RXC J0032.1+1808.

This image was taken by Hubble’s Advanced Camera for Surveys and Wide Field Camera 3 as part of an observing program called RELICS (Reionization Lensing Cluster Survey). RELICS imaged 41 massive galaxy clusters with the aim of finding the brightest distant galaxies for the forthcoming James Webb Space Telescope to study.

Expected to launch in 2020, the Webb telescope is designed to see in infrared wavelengths, which is exceedingly useful for observing distant objects. As a result of the expansion of the universe, very distant objects are highly redshifted (their light is shifted toward the redder end of the spectrum), and so infrared telescopes are needed to study them. While Hubble currently has the ability to peer billions of years into the past to see “toddler” galaxies, the Webb telescope will have the capability to study “baby” galaxies, the first galaxies that formed in the universe.
https://www.nasa.gov/image-feature/godd ... ve-cluster

And an elderly Jewish gentleman has to keep track of all that. :roll:

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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Post by Witness » Tue Jun 12, 2018 2:17 am

NGC 3256 (newly "Hubbled")


(Watch in HiRez.)
Cosmic collision lights up the darkness

Located about 100 million light-years away in the constellation of Vela (The Sails), NGC 3256 is approximately the same size as our Milky Way and belongs to the Hydra-Centaurus Supercluster. It still bears the marks of its tumultuous past in the extended luminous tails that sprawl out around the galaxy, thought to have formed 500 million years ago during the initial encounter between the two galaxies, which today form NGC 3256. These tails are studded with young blue stars, which were born in the frantic but fertile collision of gas and dust.

When two galaxies merge, individual stars rarely collide because they are separated by such enormous distances, but the gas and dust of the galaxies do interact — with spectacular results. The brightness blooming in the centre of NGC 3256 gives away its status as a powerful starburst galaxy, host to vast amounts of infant stars born into groups and clusters. These stars shine most brightly in the far infrared, making NGC 3256 exceedingly luminous in this wavelength domain. Because of this radiation, it is classified as a Luminous Infrared Galaxy.

NGC 3256 has been the subject of much study due to its luminosity, its proximity, and its orientation: astronomers observe its face-on orientation, that shows the disc in all its splendour. NGC 3256 provides an ideal target to investigate starbursts that have been triggered by galaxy mergers. It holds particular promise to further our understanding of the properties of young star clusters in tidal tails.

As well as being lit up by over 1000 bright star clusters, the central region of NGC 3256 is also home to crisscrossing threads of dark dust and a large disc of molecular gas spinning around two distinct nuclei — the relics of the two original galaxies. One nucleus is largely obscured, only unveiled in infrared, radio and X-ray wavelengths.
http://www.spacetelescope.org/news/heic1811/

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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Post by Abdul Alhazred » Sat Jun 16, 2018 1:27 pm

Image "If I turn in a sicko, will I get a reward?"

"Yes! A BIG REWARD!" ====> Click here to turn in a sicko
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Post by Witness » Mon Jun 18, 2018 12:42 am

P. – S. Happened across a picture of the gear used:

Image

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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Post by sparks » Mon Jun 18, 2018 1:13 am

How can the fore ground look so small and the Moon look so damned big? Amazing shit that.
You can lead them to knowledge, but you can't make them think.

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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Post by Witness » Mon Jun 18, 2018 1:21 am


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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Post by sparks » Mon Jun 18, 2018 1:46 am

Nice time lapse.
You can lead them to knowledge, but you can't make them think.

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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Post by Anaxagoras » Mon Jun 18, 2018 2:45 am

sparks wrote:How can the fore ground look so small and the Moon look so damned big? Amazing shit that.
Something to do with that ginormous telephoto lens I imagine.
A fool thinks himself to be wise, but a wise man knows himself to be a fool.
William Shakespeare

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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Post by Anaxagoras » Mon Jun 18, 2018 2:47 am

Witness wrote:
Love the colors and the reflections on that.
A fool thinks himself to be wise, but a wise man knows himself to be a fool.
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Post by Witness » Sun Jun 24, 2018 3:25 am

An Animator Makes a Virtual Tour of Mars Based on Real NASA Data

Until we have an actual drone flying around Mars, our best shots of Martian landscapes come from still photos taken by rovers or overhead shots from the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) for as long as it remains active.

However, with enough data from the MRO, specifically its High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera, we can make some impressive simulations of how a live flyover of the Red Planet might look. Doing exactly this, visual artist Seán Doran has compiled a large amount of HiRISE data on a specific set of Martian canyons with the awesome name of "Gorgonum Chaos", and made a series of virtual simulations of the landscape.
https://www.outerplaces.com/science/ite ... -mars-nasa




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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Post by Anaxagoras » Mon Jun 25, 2018 9:40 am

Image

https://www.nasa.gov/image-feature/jpl/ ... of-jupiter
This image captures swirling cloud belts and tumultuous vortices within Jupiter’s northern hemisphere.

NASA’s Juno spacecraft took this color-enhanced image at 10:23 p.m. PDT on May 23, 2018 (1:23 a.m. EDT on May 24), as the spacecraft performed its 13th close flyby of Jupiter. At the time, Juno was about 9,600 miles (15,500 kilometers) from the planet's cloud tops, above a northern latitude of 56 degrees.

The region seen here is somewhat chaotic and turbulent, given the various swirling cloud formations. In general, the darker cloud material is deeper in Jupiter’s atmosphere, while bright cloud material is high. The bright clouds are most likely ammonia or ammonia and water, mixed with a sprinkling of unknown chemical ingredients.

A bright oval at bottom center stands out in the scene. This feature appears uniformly white in ground-based telescope observations. However, with JunoCam we can observe the fine-scale structure within this weather system, including additional structures within it. There is not significant motion apparent in the interior of this feature; like the Great Red Spot, its winds probably slows down greatly toward the center.

Citizen scientists Gerald Eichstädt and Seán Doran created this image using data from the spacecraft’s JunoCam imager.
A fool thinks himself to be wise, but a wise man knows himself to be a fool.
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Post by Fid » Mon Jun 25, 2018 9:13 pm

Anaxagoras wrote:
sparks wrote:How can the fore ground look so small and the Moon look so damned big? Amazing shit that.
Something to do with that ginormous telephoto lens I imagine.
Indeed it does.

https://io9.gizmodo.com/5895950/this-st ... l-illusion

A repost from some pages back of a heart breakingly beautiful moonrise.

https://io9.gizmodo.com/5980370/a-moonr ... -ever-seen
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