Cool astronomy photos

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Anaxagoras
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Postby Anaxagoras » Thu Apr 26, 2018 4:00 am

A fool thinks himself to be wise, but a wise man knows himself to be a fool.
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Postby Witness » Sat Apr 28, 2018 10:52 pm

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gszFmFLg_5Y&feature=youtu.be
TheBadAstronomer wrote: It's snowing... on a comet! Actually, this INCREDIBLE animation is a series images from the Rosetta spacecraft, taken from a distance of about 13 km from the comet 67/P Chuyurmov-Gerasimenko, and put into an animation by Twitter user landru79. As the spacecraft moves around the comet we see the landscape change, but you can also see stars moving in the background, and flakes of ice and dust much closer to the spacecraft flying around! It's like something from an old movie, *but it's real*. I took his original animate GIF and repeated it; the first two clips are at fast speed, the next two at medium, and the last two at slow speed, so you can track what's going on.

Un-star-stabilized version: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zcXUawPhhJw

Time to vacuum the vacuum. :x

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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Postby Abdul Alhazred » Tue May 01, 2018 10:20 pm

Just a little reminder that we are in The Future :)

Image

Explanation: https://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap180501.html
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Postby Witness » Wed May 02, 2018 12:01 am

Abdul Alhazred wrote:Just a little reminder that we are in The Future :)
But is it dystopian? :notsure:

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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Postby Abdul Alhazred » Wed May 02, 2018 12:16 am

Need a closer shot to answer that one. :lmao:
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Postby Anaxagoras » Mon May 07, 2018 11:21 am

Image

Volcanic eruption seen from space.
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Postby Witness » Wed May 09, 2018 2:08 am

Image
APOD wrote:Explanation: Stickney Crater, the largest crater on the martian moon Phobos, is named for Chloe Angeline Stickney Hall, mathematician and wife of astronomer Asaph Hall. Asaph Hall discovered both the Red Planet's moons in 1877. Over 9 kilometers across, Stickney is nearly half the diameter of Phobos itself, so large that the impact that blasted out the crater likely came close to shattering the tiny moon. This stunning, enhanced-color image of Stickney and surroundings was recorded by the HiRISE camera onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter as it passed within some six thousand kilometers of Phobos in March of 2008. Even though the surface gravity of asteroid-like Phobos is less than 1/1000th Earth's gravity, streaks suggest loose material slid down inside the crater walls over time. Light bluish regions near the crater's rim could indicate a relatively freshly exposed surface. The origin of the curious grooves along the surface is mysterious but may be related to the crater-forming impact.
https://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap180505.html

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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Postby Anaxagoras » Wed May 09, 2018 2:28 am

Craters within a crater
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Postby Witness » Thu May 10, 2018 12:44 am

Anaxagoras wrote:Craters within a crater
Quite common on the Moon, where there are really big ones, e. g. Clavius:

Image

A link to a laboratory experiment about crater formation: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Impact_movie.ogg.

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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Postby sparks » Thu May 10, 2018 3:35 am

Clavius is where our base is.
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Postby Witness » Sat May 12, 2018 2:52 am

No pic, but an info:
The Atlantic wrote:Congress Is Quietly Nudging NASA to Look for Aliens

In October 1992, astronomers kicked off an ambitious project years in the making. Two radio telescopes, one in Puerto Rico and the other in California, started scouring the night sky for potential signals from alien civilizations somewhere deep in the cosmos.

“We begin the search,” declared Jill Tarter, the project scientist, as the telescopes started listening around glimmering stars many light-years from Earth.

A year later, the search was suddenly over. A senator from Nevada wiped out all funding for any efforts in the search for extraterrestrial intelligence, or SETI, in NASA’s budget, including this new project.
[…]
That could soon change. Lawmakers in the House of Representatives recently proposed legislation for NASA’s future that includes some intriguing language. The space agency, the bill recommends, should spend $10 million on the “search for technosignatures, such as radio transmissions” per year, for the next two fiscal years.

The House bill—should it survive a vote in the House and passage in the Senate—can only make recommendations for how agencies should use federal funding. But for SETI researchers like Tarter, the fact that it even exists is thrilling. It’s the first time congressional lawmakers have proposed using federal cash to fund SETI in 25 years.

Details: https://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2018/05/seti-technosignatures-nasa-jill-tarter/558512/

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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Postby Anaxagoras » Mon May 21, 2018 3:41 am

Image

Space selfie
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Postby Anaxagoras » Mon May 21, 2018 3:52 am

Which reminds me of a recent episode of Radiolab. Space walks can be dangerous.

https://www.wnycstudios.org/story/dark-side-earth/

Dave's description of his first spacewalk was all we could've asked for, and more. But what happened next ... well, it's just one of those stories that you always hope an astronaut will tell. Dave and Anatoly were ready to call it a job and head back into the Mir when something went wrong with the airlock. They couldn't get it to re-pressurize. In other words, they were locked out. After hours of trying to fix the airlock, they were running out of the resources that kept them alive in their space suits and facing a grisly death. So, they unhooked their tethers, and tried one last desperate move.

In the end, they made it through, and Dave went on to perform dozens more spacewalks in the years to come, but he never again experienced anything like those harrowing minutes trying to improvise his way back into the Mir.


If you are trapped outside of your space station and can't get back it, that is pretty terrifying. You are going to die in one of two horrible ways. Either from CO2 poisoning, or if you untether, you will get cooked to death (air conditioning is vital, not just for comfort).

That little blurb doesn't really do the story justice. You have to imagine what it would be like to be stuck outside for hours with time slowly running out for you and apparently no safe way in.
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Postby Witness » Tue May 22, 2018 4:31 am

The Complete Galactic Plane: Up and Down

Image
APOD wrote:Explanation: Is it possible to capture the entire plane of our galaxy in a single image? Yes, but not in one exposure -- and it took some planning to do it in two. The top part of the featured image is the night sky above Lebanon, north of the equator, taken in 2017 June. The image was taken at a time when the central band of the Milky Way Galaxy passed directly overhead. The bottom half was similarly captured six months later in latitude-opposite Chile, south of Earth's equator. Each image therefore captured the night sky in exactly the opposite direction of the other, when fully half the Galactic plane was visible. The southern half was then inverted -- car and all -- and digitally appended to the top half to show the entire central band of our Galaxy, as a circle, in a single image. Many stars and nebulas are visible, with the Large Magellanic Cloud being particularly notable inside the lower half of the complete galactic circle.
https://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap180313.html

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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Postby Witness » Wed May 23, 2018 1:52 am

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Sci News wrote:NASA’s TESS Telescope Takes Its First Image

TESS was launched on April 18, 2018, with a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket from Space Launch Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida.

This new planet-hunter will focus on stars between 30 and 300 light-years away. It will survey more than 200,000 target stars, viewing large parts of the sky for 27 days at a time.

For its two-year mission, astronomers divided the sky into 26 sectors: TESS will use four unique wide-field cameras to map 13 sectors encompassing the southern sky during its first year of observations and 13 sectors of the northern sky during the second year, altogether covering 85% of the sky.

The telescope will be watching for phenomena called transits.

A transit occurs when a planet passes in front of its star from the observer’s perspective, causing a periodic and regular dip in the star’s brightness.

The brightness of these target stars will allow astronomers to use spectroscopy, the study of the absorption and emission of light, to determine a planet’s mass, density and atmospheric composition. Water, and other key molecules, in its atmosphere can give us hints about a planets’ capacity to harbor life.

On May 17, TESS passed about 5,000 miles (8,050 km) from the Moon, which provided a gravity assist that helped the spacecraft sail toward its final working orbit.

TESS will undergo one final thruster burn on May 30 to enter its science orbit around Earth.

This highly elliptical orbit will maximize the amount of sky the telescope can image, allowing it to continuously monitor large swaths of the sky.

TESS is expected to begin science operations in mid-June after reaching this orbit and completing camera calibrations.

As part of camera commissioning, the TESS team snapped a two-second test exposure using one of its four cameras.

The image, centered on the southern constellation Centaurus, reveals more than 200,000 stars. The edge of the Coalsack Nebula is in the right upper corner and the bright star Beta Centauri is visible at the lower left edge.
http://www.sci-news.com/astronomy/tess-first-image-06022.html


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