The Coelacanth of trees

What's your artifact doing in Boss Kean's ditch?
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The Coelacanth of trees

Postby ed » Sun May 06, 2018 4:22 pm

Wollemia is a genus of coniferous tree in the family Araucariaceae. Wollemia was only known through fossil records until the Australian species Wollemia nobilis was discovered in 1994 in a temperate rainforest wilderness area of the Wollemi National Park in New South Wales, in a remote series of narrow, steep-sided sandstone gorges 150 km north-west of Sydney.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wollemia

Here is the cool thing: You can own one
http://www.wollemipine.com/order.php
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Re: The Coelacanth of trees

Postby Rob Lister » Sun May 06, 2018 6:15 pm

Image

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Re: The Coelacanth of trees

Postby ed » Sun May 06, 2018 7:06 pm

And how many months did you walk around in the woods till you found that?
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Re: The Coelacanth of trees

Postby Witness » Sun May 06, 2018 8:26 pm

You may have examined some other Araucarians in person, even if you live in America: many of the expired trees in Petrified Forest National Park in Arizona were members of this family called Araucarioxylon arizonicum that grew to 200 feet before 200 million years ago.

What all these trees have in common, besides their common ancestry, is P.O. Boxes in the southern hemisphere. They are, in fact, all members of the "Antarctic Flora", the remnants of the plant life that thrived on the ancient supercontinent Gondwana, the southern half of the former One-Continent-to-Rule-The-All Pangaea.

When Gondwana itself broke up, India and Africa headed northward, merged with the remnants of Laurasia (the northern half of Pangaea), and lost much of their Antarctic flora. Antarctica broke away from South America, became polar, and lost most of its plant life due to the persuasive presence of a crushing, miles-thick ice sheet.

But South America, Australia, New Zealand, and parts of Southeast Asia still contain plants that were all once part of the Antarctic Flora, despite their now-extreme distance from one another. Hence, the southern beeches (Nothofagus sp.) are found in South America, Australia, and New Zealand. The monkey puzzle tree is found in South America, the Kauri in New Zealand and the Norfolk Island Pine in the Pacific north of Australia and New Zealand.
https://blogs.scientificamerican.com/artful-amoeba/the-lost-valley-of-the-wollemi-pine/

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Thanks ed. I knew about these trees (old article in Sci Am) but not that they were for sale.




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Shouldn't the… uh… meta-thread (?) be renamed from "Archaeology" to "Archaeology & Paleontology"?

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Re: The Coelacanth of trees

Postby ed » Sun May 06, 2018 10:07 pm

I bought some bristlecone pine seeds a long time ago. They didn't make it in CT, maybe down here ....

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Re: The Coelacanth of trees

Postby Witness » Mon May 07, 2018 3:27 am

ed wrote:Arch and paleo is good for me
OK, so we'll ask (Image) our Master of Ceremonies: Pyrrho, can the subforum/metathread be renamed from "Archaeology" to "Archaeology & Paleontology", please?


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